thomasson

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ANCESTORS OF PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON

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PARENTS OF PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON

JAMES C. THOMASSON SR was born Abt 1764 in Louisa Co VA; died 26 Jan 1849 in Filbert(York) SC. He was the son of Thomas & Anne (McAllister) Thomasson.
James married CHARLOTTE BRINKLEY COZART 28 Dec 1802 in Persons Co NC. Who was born Abt 1786 in Granville Co NC; died 27 May 1843 in Filbert(York) SC. She was the daughter of James & Sarah (Brinkley) Cozart.
James & Charlotte Thomasson are buried in Union Church Cemetery in Filbert, SC

Notes for James C. Thomasson, Sr:
(The following biographical account is from "Thomasson Traces, Narrative of the Thomasson Family 1677 - 1995" Volume II, by Curtis H. Thomasson & Marjorie B. Malloy)
James C. Thomasson was born in 1764 in Louisa County, Virginia to Thomas and Ann (McAllister) Thomasson. The family later moved to Granville County, North Carolina, about the time of the Revolutionary War where thy settled in the Oxford Disrict of the county. James was too young to serve in the army at the outset of the war, but his father sent him with supplies to the American camp on numerous occasions. The Thomassons were paid with army cerificates for the supplies, and these were later used by the senior Thomasson to pay the taxes on his Granville County property. James had three older brothers who did serve in the American army: William Pollard, Nathaniel, and George. (Note: Per the History of Arkansas by Goodspeed, a biography of Dr David H. Thomasson states that his father James Thomasson was under the proper age for enlistment at the commencement of the Revolutionary War, but during the progress of the war, nd when quite young, James joined a company of troops in which two or three of his brothers were in service. These brothers had to be George, Nathaniel, and William Pollard.) James did not marry until he was thirty-eight years old. If there was an earlier marriage there was no issue, and the only record that has been located is his marriage to Charlotte Brinkley Cozart in Persons County, North Carolina on December 28, 1802. Charlotte was the daughter of James Cozart and his wife Sarah Brinkley of Orange County, North Carolina.
Soon after their marriage in 1802, James and Charlotte moved to York District, South Carolina where Nathaniel nd William Pollard, two older brothes of James had already sedttled. James and Charlotte built their home close to the village of Yorkville on the old Kings Mountain Highway. The first deeds recorded in the York County Courthouse show that James Thomasson, Sr bought the following tracts of land in 1819: 200 acres on Fishing Creek from David Porter, 117 acres on Fishing creek from William Hogge, 158 acres on Allison Creek from Joseph Graham, 112 acres on Fishing Creek from William B. Henderson, 163 acres on Fishing Creek from Benjamin McWhorter's estate.
All of this land is in the vicinity of the Filbert Community. Here James built his home and raised his family of ten boys. There was another son who died in infancy. The Union Baptist Church was organized in Filbert on March 24, 1838, with sixteen charter members among which were James and Charlotte Thomasson. - - - - -The graveyard adjoining the church is filled with numerous Thomasson graves. James and Charlotte were among the first to be interred here, and their markers are still legible: James C. Thomasson, Sr who departed this life Jan 6, 1849 in the 87thyear of his life; Charlotte Cozart consort of James Thomasson, Snr who departed this life 27 May 1843 aged 57 years.
In 1845, following the death of his wife, Charlotte,- - -James Thomasson had his land surveyed and laid off in tracts for his sons. The survey was made by William Campbell and was dated September 6, 1845. James Thomasson drafted his will on September 1, 1847, and made ample provisions for all of his sons. The tracts of land defined in Campbell's survey of the Thomasson property two years previous wee legally deeded to his sons at his death. Three of his eleven sons (Thomas Jefferson, Joseph & Nelson G.)were not mentioned in the will as they were deceased and had not left any heirs. Five of the boys later sold their property and migrated to Arkansas. (Pasons Alvis, David Horace, Gilbert Lafayette, Simon Bolivar & William Pleasant). The three remaining boys, James C, Jr, Hiram Cozart, and Doctor Alfred stayed in York District.
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1 Sep 1847 - York Co SC (York Co Wills, Vol 3, pages 239-242)
Will of James Thomasson Senr, State of South Carolina, York District. I James Thomasson Senr. of the District and State aforesaid, being aged and feeble in health, but of a sound and disposing mind and memory do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following, to wit;
1 whereas I have heretofore given to my son James C. Thomasson, certain property to wit; a negro man named Henry, a negro woman Letta, the tract of land of which he now resides called the Beatty tract some stock and household furniture, it is my wish that his right to the same be confirmed and I will and devise the same to him and his heirs forever.
2nd And whereas I have given to my son Wm. P. Thomasson a negro man named Rener, a woman Harriet also stock and household furniture, of equal value of that given to my other sons, it is my wish that his title to the same be confirmed, and I will and devise the same to him and his heirs forever, the tract of land which I gave to my son William I afterwards purchased of him.
3rd The property which I have heretofore given to my son Hiram C. Thomasson to wit; the negro man named Isom girl Vina, stock and household furniture equal with my other sons, also the tract of land on which he now lives containing 215 acres more or less, according to the survey and plat thereof made by William Campbell deputy surveyer and dated 6th September 1845, I will and devise to him and his heirs forever.
4th The property which I have given to my son P. A. Thomasson, to wit; a negro boy named Henry, girl Louisa, the tract of land on which he now lives, containing one hundred and fifty acres more or less, stock and household furniture equal with my other sons, I will and devise to him and his heirs forever.
5 And whereas I have given to my son Dr. D.A. Thomasson the sum of Eight hundred and thirty six to complete his education, and to procure for him a profession, now it is my intention that the same shall stand to him in lieu of the tracts of land which I have given to each of my other children, the boy Daniel & girl Sue I will and devise to him and his heirs forever.
6 I will and devise unto my son G.L. Thomasson a negro boy named Albert girl Margaret, the tract of land on which I now live known as the McWhorter tract, being the balance of the Porter tract, after taking of that part which I have given to my son Hiram C. Thomasson, and the Henderson tract containing about one hundred & eleven acres, one bed & furniture to be selected by him after my death a horse & saddle the horse he now claims, and which is in his possession, and stock of equal value with that given to my other children, to him and his heirs forever.
7 I will and devise to my son Hiram C. Thomasson, a negro girl named Harriet, & her increase, in trust for the use and benefit of my son Doctor Alfred Thomasson during the term of his natural life not subject or liable to any debts contracts or undertaking entered into him him, but only intended for his use and benefit during life, and at his death to go to any child or children he may leave living at that time, divested of all trusts and limitation whatsoever; but should my son Doctor Alfred Thomasson die leaving no child or grand child alive at his death, then I will and devise the said negro girl together with her increase to be equally divided between my seven children herein mentioned share and share alike.
8 I will and devise unto my son James C. Thomasson, a negro boy Allison, the tract of land known as the Willis tract, containing about one hundred and seventeen acres, also the tract of land known as a part of the Wright tract containing one hundred and three acres to be laid off according to a survey and plat thereof made by William Campbell deputy surveyer and dated 6th Sept 1845, in trust, for the use and benefit of my son Simon B. Thomasson during the term of his natural life, not subject or liable to any debts or contracts made by him, but only intended for the use and benefit of himself and children during life, and at his death to go to any child or children he may leave living at that time divested of all trusts or limitation whatsoever.
9 I will and devise that all the property which may be in my possession, and not herein before specifically devised, be sold by my executors hereinafter appointed and after the payment of all my just debts, that the balance of the procedes of the same be equally divided between my eight children herein mentioned share and share alike; the shares or amounts to which my sons Doctor Alfred Thomasson and Simon B. Thomasson may be entitled to go to their respective trustees herein before appointed and by them to be vested in property, or loaned out at interest for their use and benefit during life, and at their death to be disposed of as herein before provided in the seventh and eight clauses of this my will, in reference to them.
10 I will and devise that all monies which may be in my possession, or due me at the time of my death, either by note, account, or otherwise, whether from my own children for the purchase of property at a sale made by me sometime since, or from others, be equally divided between my eight sons herein before mentioned share and share alike, the shares falling to my sons Doctor Alfred & Simon B. to go and be disposed of as herein before provided in the ninth clause of this my last will and testament.
11 I appoint James C. Thomasson and Wm. P. Thomasson my sons my executors to carry out the object of this my last will and testament as witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 1 day of September 1847. Signed sealed and acknowledged in presence of us W.I. Clawson, Wm L. Brown, Hane Keely. JAMES THOMASSON (his mark)
CODICIL
It is my will and desire that before a division of my property take place as provided in the Ninth and Tenth clauses of my will that my executors pay to P.A. Thomasson the sum of two hundred dollars over and above the share of my othger children in consideration of the value of the land given to him being less than that given to my other children. Signed sealed and acknowledge in the presence of us Sept. 1st 1847. W.I. Clawson, Wm L. Brown, Hane Keely. JAMES THOMASSON (his mark) Probated January 15, 1849
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1810 - Federal Census (York Co SC)
T525 THOMASON James M-25 276 No Twp Listed
1820 - Federal Census (York Co SC)
T525 THOMASON James M-33 162 511101-00010
T525 THOMASON Lemuel M-33 163 320020-10010
1830 - Federal Census (York Co SC)
T521 THOMASSON JAMES JR. M-19 173 382 No Twp Listed
1840 - Federal Census (York Co SC)
T525 THOMASON James C. M-70 516 283 No Twp Listed

Children of James Thomasson and Charlotte Cozart are:
i. James C. Thomasson, Jr, born 26 Mar 1804 in Granville Co NC; died 12 Aug 1854 in York Co SC; married Jane Stuart Miller 1832 in York Co SC.

ii. William Pleasant Thomasson, born 4 Jul 1806 in Orange Co NC; died 12 Mar 1878 in Pansy(Cleveland) AR; married Elizabeth Ann Brown.

iii. Hiram Cozart Thomasson, born 22 Jan 1811 in York Co SC; died 7 Feb 1882 in York Co SC; married Harriett Amanda Brown 1 Feb 1849 in York Co SC; born 9 Feb 1826 in York Co SC; died 14 Sep 1896 in York Co SC.

iv. Nelson G. Thomasson, born 4 Oct 1813 in York Co SC; died 25 Sep 1842 in York Co SC; married Emily Youngblood 30 May 1840 in York Co SC.

v. PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON, born 8 Jan 1815 in Filbert(York) SC; died 7 Jun 1899 in Cornerville(Lincoln) AR; married (1) Elizabeth Gordon Jackson9 May 1842 in York Co SC; married (2) Almira Jones(2) Abt 1860 in Drew Co AR.

vi. Doctor Alfred Thomasson, born Abt 1816 in York Co SC; died 28 Nov 1850 in York Co SC; married Mary Whitaker 1849 in York Co SC.

vii. Thomas Jefferson Thomasson, born Abt 1818 in York Co SC; died 27 Jun 1839 in York Co SC.

viii. David Horace Thomasson, M.D., born 16 Jan 1819 in York Co SC; died 24 Aug 1903 in Pansy(Cleveland) AR; married Chiloneas Bell 16 Aug 1859 in Monticello(Drew) AR.

ix. Joseph Thomasson, born Abt 1820.

x. Gilbert Lafayette Thomasson, born 4 Feb 1823 in York Co SC; died 16 Feb 1871 in Monticello(Drew) AR; married Martha A. Boggs 16 Mar 1848 in York Co SC.

xi. Simon Bolivar Thomasson, born 19 May 1825 in York Co SC; died 7 Feb 1896 in Drew Co AR; married (1) Isabelle Floyd(1); married (2) Mary Adelaide Cooper(2).

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PATERNAL GRANDPARENTS OF PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON

THOMAS THOMASSON, born 25 Feb 1736/37 in Hanover Co VA; died 26 Aug 1818 in Granville Co NC. He was the son of George & Mary (Pollard) Thomasson.
Thomas married ANNE McALLISTER Abt 1759 in Louisa Co VA who was born Abt 1741 in Louisa Co VA; died Abt 1810 in Granville Co NC. She was the daughter of William & Elizabeth (Garland) McAllister.

Notes for Thomas Thomasson:
(The following biographical account is from "Thomasson Traces, Narrative of the Thomasson Family 1677 - 1995" Volume II, by Curtis H. Thomasson & Marjorie B. Malloy)
Thomas Thomasson was born February 25, 1737, in Hanover County, Virginia, the third child and second son of George and Mary (Pollard) Thomasson. His father had patented 1600 acres of land on the branches of Christopher's Run in 1736, a year and a half before his birth. Thomas was probably the first child to be born on the Louisa plantation (which at this time was located in Hanover.) His father must have been busy building his home, constructing a mill on the waters of Christopher's Run, planting crops, clearing land, and all the many myriad responsibilities of establishing a home on the frontier. This area of Virginia was sparsely populated and still infested with Indians when the Thomassons first settled on the land.
Thomas grew up on the Louisa plantation and married a neighbor's daughter, Anne Mackalester, daughter of William Mackalester and his wife, Elizabeth Garland. They settled on a 210 acre tract of land which was part of the original 1600 acres issued to George Thomasson in 1736. Thomas and Anne were legally deeded this property in 1763 by George Thomasson, Sr which they sold on October 20, 1777, to Philip Carpenter. - - -About a month later on November 10, 1777, Thomas sold another tract of 350 acres between Duckinghold Creek and Christopher's Run to Thomas Gooch, evidently geting ready for his move to Granville County.
About the month of December in 1777, three sons of George and Mary (Pollard) Thomasson moved their families to Granville County, Norh Carolina. Thomas settled on the west side of Fishing Creek in the Oxford District; Richard bought property in the Epping Forest District where he built a mill on his waterway that became known as "Richard Thomasson's Old Mill"; and John received a land grant on Fishing Creek. The Revolutionary War was in full progress at the time the three Thomasson brothers left Louisa County Virginia For North Carolina. Thomas drafted for service in the North Carolina Militia, but there is no record that Richard ever served in the continental Army.
Thomas, who was forty years old at this time, was drafted for service in the North Carolina Militia soon after his arrival in Granville County. His son William Pollard Thomasson, who had just reached his fifteenth birthday, reported for duty in his father's place. This was customary practice at this time. After serving his father's tour of duty, William Pollard reenlisted i his own name, even though this was a time of almost constant defeat for the American Army. Why Thomas could not serve at the time he was drafted is not known. Family responsibilities probably had a great influence. Although he never served in the Continental Army or the Militia, Thomas furnished supplied on several occasions as evidence by claims presented to the Hillsborough Treasury Office in Granville County. On May 11, 1784, he was paid sixteen shillings for Claim No. 6389, and on another occasion he was reimbursed 3 pounds, 13 shillings on Voucher No. 42 (Revolutionary Army Accounts, North Carolina Archives, Vol VI, page 58, folio 3). Another son, James C. Thomasson, took supplies to his brother after the battle of Guilford Court House and was with him in the American camp. William Pollard Thomasson served in the army until the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, October 18, 1781.
Thomas Thomasson, Sr had lived to the advanced age of eighty-one years when he died in November 1819. From documents in his estate file one can get a picture of his home and family t the time of his death. Three of his sons had moved to York District, South Carolina: William Pollard, Nathaniel and James C. Two of his daughters, Annie and Elizabeth, had married and moved away from home. His sons, George, John, Nelson, and Thomas, Jr, were living on property bordering the homeplace that was "lent" to them by their father when they married. Two unmarried daughters, Mary (called Molly) and Lydia, were still living at home and evidently had cared for their aged father until his death.
Thomas was still maintaining a working farm even though he was eighty-one years old and had lost his wife Anne. He owned 520 acres of land which he farmed with the help of two Negro families consisting of two men, four women, and three young boys. At the time of his death he had just harvested a crop of corn, wheat, fodder, oats and tobacco. He also must have raised fruit, as he had an Apple Mill among his possessions. He grew cotton and flax and had a herd of twenty-two cattle, forty-two sheep, and thirty-one hogs. Thomas made his own whiskey at his still, and shoes for the family were made right on the plantation. His home was sizable as he had five rooms of bedroom furniture. According to the times in which he lived, Thomas Thomasson was a successful planter.
His will was probated in the February 1820 term of court by his son George Thomasson, whom he had appointed sole executor of his will. The large estate which Thomas had accumulated during the forty-odd years he had resided in Granville County became embroiled in controversy among his heirs. It was 1825, five years later, before a final accounting was recorded in the Probate Court of Granville County. The estate returns give a valuable insight into this generation and is probably the only good result of this squabbling among heirs.
Special bequeaths were made to Molly and Lydia, as they were unmarried and still living at home. He lent them the homeplace jointly until their deaths, at which time he directed that all his property, including that "lent" to his sons, Nelson and Thomas, was to be sold, with the proceeds to be equally divided amongst all the children. Evidently Thomas intended that Nelson and Thomas, Jr would have to purchase their property from the whole estate at the time of their sister's death, with each child receivng a proportionate share of the money arising from the sale. Molly and Lydia were thirty-five to forty years of age at their father's death and must not have been expected to marry.

Mar 1818 - Granville County, NC (Will of Thomas Thomasson, Sr)
In the name of God Amen the _day of March 1818, I, Thomas Thomasson Senr of the County of Granville & State of North Carolina, being of sound mind & memory (at this time) for which blessing I thank the Eternal Being, but calling to mind that all flesh (or in other words) the whole of the human family must yeald to death when ever it may please God to call, do make this my last Will & Testament in manner and form following (to wit)
I lend to my son Nelson Thomasson one hundred & forty acres of land, so as to include the house and plantation where he now lives, to begin on the South Boundary of my land and run a due North course for that number of acres.
I lend to my two daughters (sic) jointly, that is to say Molly & Lidy, a part of my land begining near my son George's house and to run as direct a course as can, so as not to include the house where my son Thomas now lives, untill it intersects the North boundary of my land. all the balance of my land lying East of the last mentioned line to be run, I lend unto my son Thomas Tomasson -
The whole of my land which I have lent to my four above mentioned children, my will and desire is shall be sold by my Executor hereafter to be named as soon as the last one of my two daug (sic) above mentioned shall depart this life & the money arising from said sale to be equally divided amongst the whole of my children both boys and girls -
Item I give unto my daugters Molly & Liddy two choice sheep each also one cow and calf each the choice of my flock one bed & furniture each their own choice, & my riding mare jointly known by the name of Nancey.
Also I jointly give unto them a negro boy by the name of Sam, - Item my will & desire is that immediately after my death that my executor to sell the whole of my personal estate which I have not herein give to my two above mentioned daughters, and the proceeds thereof after paying my just and lawfull debts, to be eqally (sic) divided amongst all my children (except one hundred and eighty dollars which sum I wish to be deducted from my son John Thomasson's part of my Estate, - which sum I wish to be equally divided amongst the remainder part of my children.
Lastly, I constitute and appoint my son George Thomasson, Executor to this my last Will and Testament as witness my hand and seal the day and date above written - Thomas Thomasson (Signature)
Witness: Thos Cooke, Jurat, Benja Thomasson, James Clay
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16 Dec 1819 - Granville Co, NC (Inventory of the Estate of Thomas Thomasson)
The sale of the property took place on the 29th, 30th and 31st of December, 1819, and again on the 14th of February, 1820. James C. and Nathaniel Thomasson, who had moved to York District, South Carolina, were present at the sale and made purchases from their father's estate. Lemuel and Willia, Jr, sons of William Pollard Thomasson, deceased, also from York District, South, were persent at the sale and made several purchases.
It is interesting to note that in the above sale, most of the Negroes, belonging to the estate of Thomas Thomasson, Sr were purchased by the sons who had moved to York District, South Carolina - James C., Nathaniel, and Lemuel and William for their deceased father, William Pollard. James purchased a Negro man, a Negro woman and child, and another Negro woman with two children. Nathaniel purchased a Negro man, woman, and girl, evidently a family. Lemuel purchased a Negro girl Charlott. When the executor George Thomasson called upon the purchasers of the estate to pay or enter into bond with security for their purchases, James Thomasson disclaimed having purchased Esther and her child Willis for himself. Rather he claimed that he had bid for them for his sisters, Mary and Lydia. The money was therefore taken from the sister's account, and the Negroes delivered into their possession. Molly died in January, 1823, about five years after her father. Lydia, the surviving spinster sister, decided to move to York District, South Carolina, where three of her brothers had moved. Her brother James came to Granville County to help her move, taking the slaves Esther and her children (three by this time), and also Sam who had been willed to the two girls jointly by their father. Parker F. Stone, court appointed administrator of Molly Thomasson's esate, filed suit March 8, 1823, to stop the removal of the Negroes from Granville County until a division and settlement of Mary's estate could be made.
Another suit was entered by George Thomasson, executor of Thomas' estate, against Nelson Thomasson as security for his brother Nathaniel, who "lived out-of-state in South Carolina." It seems that Nathaniel never paid the balance of $400 for his purchases from his father's estate sale. Nelson, as security, was sued for the money. Hard feelings between the children of Thomas Thomasson were evident in the settlement of his estate. Lydia never moved to South. She stayd in Granville County until her death in 1846. (Note: Among the items in the inventory were 10 negro slaves: 4 women named Fanny, Easter, Milley, Charlott; 2 men named Jack & Richmond; 1 girl named Winney; 3 boys named Willis, Henry & Sam (Sam willed to Lydia & Mary) 4 head of horses; 1 mare willed to Lydia & Mary; the cattle, sheep, hogs and crops mentioned above & all the other considerable amount of household/farm property)

Children of Thomas Thomasson and Anne McAllister are:
i. George Thomasson, born Abt 1760 in Louisa Co VA; died 1836 in Granville Co NC; married Martha Hudspeth 1780 in Granville Co NC.
ii. Nathaniel Thomasson, born Abt 1762 in Louisa Co VA; died Sep 1838 in York Co SC; married Elizabeth Cottrell 7 Nov 1796 in Granville Co NC.
iii. William Pollard Thomasson, born 4 Feb 1763 in Louisa Co VA; died 31 Jan 1818 in York Co SC; married Mary Ann Reeves 23 Nov 1782 in Granville Co NC.
iv. JAMES C. THOMASSON SR, born Abt 1764 in Louisa Co VA; died 26 Jan 1849 in Filbert(York) SC; married Charlotte Brinkley Cozart 28 Dec 1802 in Persons Co NC.
v. Anne Thomasson, born Abt 1772 in Louisa Co VA; married Solomon Hudspeth 22 Aug 1792 in Granville Co NC.
vi. Elizabeth Thomasson, born Abt 1777 in Louisa Co VA; married Philip A. Johnson 7 Nov 1797 in Granville Co NC.
vii. John Thomasson, born Abt 1780 in Granville Co NC; married Patsy Ann Freman 10 Nov 1804 in Granville Co NC.
viii. Lydia Thomasson, born Abt 1782 in Granville Co NC; died 1846 in Granville Co NC.
ix. Mary "Molly" Thomasson, born Abt 1783 in Granville Co NC; died Jan 1823 in Granville Co NC.
x. Nelson Thomasson, born Abt 1785 in Granville Co NC; married Martha Clay Johnson 10 Dec 1808 in Granville Co NC.
xi. Thomas Thomasson, born Abt 1787 in Granville Co NC; married Susannah Price Clay 6 Dec 1810 in Granville Co NC.

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MATERNAL GRANDPARENTS OF PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON

JAMES COZART, born Abt 1760 in NC ?; died 7 Dec 1805 in Orange Co NC. He was the son of Anthony & Winnifred (Bumpass) Cozart III.
James Cozart married SARAH BRINKLEY 23 Aug 1796 in Orange Co NC.

Children of James Cozart and Sarah Brinkley are:
i. CHARLOTTE BRINKLEY COZART, born Abt 1786 in Granville Co NC; died 27 May 1843 in Filbert(York) SC; married James C. Thomasson, Sr 28 Dec 1802 in Persons Co NC.
ii. Hiram Cozart, born Abt 1788.
iii. Lively Cozart, born Abt 1790.
iv. Edy Cozart, born Abt 1793.
v. David Cozart, born Abt 1795.
vi. William P. Cozart, born Abt 1798.
vii. Jemima Cozart, born Abt 1800.
viii. Sarah Cozart, born Abt 1803.

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GREAT-GRANDPARENTS OF PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON

GEORGE THOMASSON, born 10 Nov 1703 in King William Co VA; died 22 Aug 1783 in Louisa Co VA. He was the son of Thomas Thomasson and unknown wife.
George Thomasson married MARY POLLARD Abt 1733 in Hanover Co VA who was born 6 Nov 1706 in Hanover Co VA; died Aft. 1783 in Louisa Co VA. She was the daughter of Richard & Martha (Fleming) Pollard.

Notes for George Thomasson:
(The following biographical account is from "Thomasson Traces, Narrative of the Thomasson Family 1677 - 1995" Volume II, by Curtis H. Thomasson & Marjorie B. Malloy)
George Thomasson was born November 10, 1703 in St John's Parish, King William County, Virginia, the son of Thomas Thomasson, who was originally from England. His birthplace is documented by the fact that his father was a resident of King William County prior to 1703. - - - George Thomasson married Mary Pollard ca 1733, probably in Hanover County. She was the daughter of Richard Pollard and his wife Martha Fleming. His wife's maternal grandfather was William Fleming, who was sheriff of Hanover County in 1727. The Fleming property adjoined that of Thomas Thomasson according to the Virginia Land Patents.
In the early Virginia records, George Thomasson is frequently referred to as "George Thomason, Planter." The title of planter was given to early land owners who owned in excess of 1,000 acres. On June 5, 1736, George Thomasson patented 1600 acres of land on both sides of Christopher's Run in what was originally Hanover County, but later became Louisa in 1742. Initially this property was within the boundaries of Fredericksville Parish, but became Trinity Parish when Fredericksville was divided in 1762. (Today would be located on Route 613)
The Louisa County Deed Books have numerous references to land transactions during the lifetime of George Thomasson. He gave each son 200 acres of land upon their marriage and legally recorded the deeds on May 10, 1763. There is no record of any property given to any of the daughters when they married, probably because their husband were already well established. Most of the children stayed in Louisa and surrounding counties and became prominent in the history of early Virginia.
George Thomasson was too old to serve in the Continental Army during the War of Independence, but he furnished supplies on several occasions as evidenced by the public service claims in Louisa County. On June 13, 1781, he was allowed 3 pence per pound for 850 lbs of beef delivered to John Jouett. Then again on November 1, 1781, George Thomason was allowed 3 pence per pound for 275 lbs of beef received by William Anderson. Any Thomasson decendant of George and Mary (Pollard) Thomasson would be eligible for DAR membership on his contribution of supplies to the American army.
The Thomasson plantation in Louisa was a self-contained, working plantation. At the time of his death George Thomasson had twenty slaves, and everything the family needed was produced on the plantation. Crops included wheat, cotton, corn, rye, oats, tobacco, flax and garden vegetables. He had three yokes of oxen which was probably used to do the heavy hauling and plowing around the homeplace. In the fields he kept nineteen cattle, sixty-six hogs, four horses, nineteen sheep and thirteen geese. There were two milk cows and one bull. Brandy, whiskey, cider and vinegar were made on the place and large quantities were stored in hogsheads and casks. He kept as much as a pound of pepper at one time and quantities of bacon, honey, bees wax, butter and salt.
All kinds of farming tools were used on the plantation. There were spoon moulds, shot moulds, candle moulds, shoe lasts and cooper's tools (used to repair the barrels and casks need to store liquids.) quantities of lead, nails, iron, steel, files, hinges, raw leather, planks, sisal (fiber used in making ropes,) spun wool, cotton and flax were kept in constant supply for the use of the large family and slave population.
When an inventory of the estate was made at the time of his death in 1783, the appraisers listed six beds and furniture which indicate the large size of the Thomasson home. Also listed in the inventory were three guns and a bugle horn.
On a branch of Christopher's Run, George Thomasson built a mill, and the parish opened up a road to this mill which became known as Thomasson's Mill Road. There was also a road leading from the Thomasson plantation to the Louisa Court House that was known as Thomasson's Court house Road.
Life for the Thomassons in early Virginia had to be busy to clear, plant, and cultivate a plantation the size of George Thomasson's. He and Mary raised a large family of six sons and four daughters; all of whom married into prominent Virginia families. At the time of their marriage, it appears that George Thomasson gave each child a negro slave who was formally deeded to them in his last will and testament. These slaves did not show up in the inventory of his estate, probably because they were not on his property at the time of his death. George Thomasson signed his will on August 19, 1783, and died three days later on August 22nd. He was eighty years old.
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10 May 1763 - Louisa Co VA (Deed Book C)
I, George Thomasson of Louisa co, Trinity Parish, for love, good will and affection towards my loving son William Thomasson of the same Parish and County; 200 acres with plantation where said William Thomasson now lives; unto my loving son Thomas Thomasson, 210 acres, with the plantation where said Thomas now lives; to my loving son Richard Thomasson 200 acres of land and the plantation that is now called the New Design, also I give to my loving son John Thomasson 200 acres of which these presents have delivered them. Signed 10 May 1763. George Thomasson. Wit: John Byars, Nicholas Talley (Note: All these boys eventually left Louisa County; William moved to Henry County, Virginia, on the North Carolina border; Thomas and Richard moved to Granville County, North Carolina on the Virginia border; John Thomasson also left Louisa for Granville County, but eventually settrled in Stokes County, North Carolina.)

Children of George Thomasson and Mary Pollard are:
i. William Thomasson, born Abt 1734; died Oct 1800 in Henry Co VA; married (1) Sarah Turner(1); married (2) Mary Estes(2).
ii. Elizabeth Thomasson, born 27 Feb 1734/35; died 12 Oct 1823 in Washington Co VA; married Capt John Byars.
iii. THOMAS THOMASSON, born 25 Feb 1736/37 in Hanover Co VA; died 26 Aug 1818 in Granville Co NC; married Anne McAllister Abt 1759 in Louisa Co VA.
iv. Richard Pollard Thomasson, born 24 Dec 1739; died 1808 in Granville Co NC; married Elizabeth.
v. John Thomasson, born 20 Oct 1741; married Edith.
vi. George Thomasson, born 18 Feb 1742/43; married Elizabeth Timberlake.
vii. Ann Thomasson, born 4 Apr 1749; married Robert Currin 1783 in Louisa Co VA.
viii. Fleming Thomasson, born 19 Dec 1751; married Ann Smith 1782 in Louisa Co VA.
ix. Christiana Thomasson, born 31 Aug 1754; died 18 Sep 1831; married John Timberlake 12 Apr 1773 in Louisa Co VA.
x. Sarah Thomasson, born 2 Nov 1758; married John Bibb 29 Sep 1779 in Louisa Co VA.

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GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER OF PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON

Click for more information:
THOMAS THOMASSON (The Immigrant Ancestor from England)
He was the son of George & Catharine (Hutton) Thomason.

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GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDPARENTS OF PASSINS ALVIS THOMASSON

Click for more information:
GEORGE & CATHERINE (HUTTON) THOMASON (Ancestors of London, England)