Scot-Irish ANCIENT ORIGINS OF OUR SCOTS-IRISH ANCESTORS

Donald Earl McKinney Sr (Our Father's Scots-Irish Ancestors Who Settled in America during the 1700's):
SIMPSON; DOWNEY; KILGORE

Eda Faye Thomasson (Our Mother's Scots-Irish Ancestors Who Settled in America during the 1700's):
JACKSON; GORDON; MORRISON; GOINGS; McCANTS; ELLIOTT

Several of our ancestors from IRELAND were actually "SCOTCH-IRISH/SCOTS-IRISH".
These are terms widely used in America to describe Protestant settlers from SCOTLAND who settled in the Ulster Province of northern IRELAND during the 1600's. This "Great Plantation" of 1609 was King James’ plan to remove the Catholic Irish from their lands and replace them with Scottish and English Protestants.

Most of these transplanted Scottish settlers were Lowland Scots & a few English who resided along the border between Scotland/England. However, some of the settlers were probably from the highlands.
They descended from various ancient warrior tribes including the Celtic BRITONS & SCOTS, the Teutonic ANGLES & SAXONS, the Norse VIKINGS & the NORMANS.

ULSTER is the extreme northern province of Ireland & thousands of these "SCOTCH-IRISH" later immigrated to the AMERICAN COLONIES during the 1700’s, mainly in the frontier areas along the Appalachian corridor from Pennsylvania to the Carolinas. These rugged frontiersmen played a significant part in the Revolutionary War. They were recognized as highly skilled & fearless warriors during the Revolution & throughout the various Indian conflicts of that era.

The use of the term "IRISH" in the United States before the 1840’s usually meant SCOTCH-IRISH, since very few Catholic Irish of southern Ireland had immigrated to America until that time. The term “Scotch-Irish” was re-established by American historians to differentiate between this Irish Presbyterian migration of the 1700’s to the American frontier & the Irish Catholic settlers who began a huge migration to the American cities of New England after the potato famine of the 1840’s.

"ULSTER-SCOTS" is the term normally used in the United Kingdom & Canada to describe these settlers.
Centuries later, during the Irish revolution of the early 1900's, the southern provinces of Ireland (mostly Catholic), became independent of British rule, while the northern Ulster province (mostly Protestant) remained with England & the United Kingdom.